Genealogy double dating

Content
  • Getting the Date Right
  • Understanding the Gregorian Calendar for Genealogy
  • Family Tree
  • Dual dating
  • Genealogy double dating
  • Research Tip – Calendars and Double Dating
  • Genealogy double dating
  • Genealogical Double-Dating?!? The Julian Calendar Explained
  • Vita Brevis
  • Dangerous dates

Dates are a very important part of historical and genealogical research, but they also aren’t always as they appear. For most of us, the Gregorian calendar in common use today is all we encounter in modern records. Eventually, however, as we work back in time, or delve into religious or ethnic records, it is common to encounter other calendars and dates with which we aren’t familiar. These calendars can complicate the recording of dates in our family tree, unless we can accurately convert and record the calendar dates into a standard format, so that there is no further confusion.

Getting the Date Right

When the glossy new calendars start arriving in December, it probably doesn’t occur to you that New Year’s Day was not always 1 January. Furthermore, it may not be obvious how this can affect your genealogical research. Calendars were developed to make sense of the natural cycle of time: It took some experimentation before folks got it to the current system. There are many calendars, but for right now, we need be concerned only with the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

The Julian calendar resulted from Julius Caesar’s reformation of the system to conform more closely to the seasons. To compensate, the Gregorian calendar dropped 10 days from October in And to keep this problem of extra days from reoccurring, one day was added to February in every year divisible by 4. This may alternately be shown as 23 January O. The Gregorian calendar was adopted by different nations at different times.

It was generally adopted by Britain and her colonies in The day added to the calendar every four years leap year meant that the calendar was now 11 days out of sync with the solar cycle. To take care of this, the system was adjusted so that the leap day is dropped from every century mark not divisible by 4.

Why do you need to be aware of this interesting bit of trivia? The calendar change makes dates in the months of January, February, and up to 25 March, prior to , subject to double dating. This doesn’t actually change the date of his birth, merely the way it is expressed. In , February was almost the end of the year because began on 25 March. After the year there are two things to contend with: The calendar change affects your research because it is sometimes hard to determine whether the dates are meant to be old style or new style.

You may think that the change was not significant enough to make a difference in your research, but it does. If you find records that indicate Abraham was born on 27 March and his younger sister Ruth was born on 23 March , you may think there is something wrong. In reality, it is likely correct, because 23 March of in the old style calendar followed 27 March by about 12 months.

Though the difference of 11 days can explain some records he died on the third of the month but was not buried until the thirteenth , genealogists should not convert dates to account for the day difference unless the old style date would cause confusion. If it does, change it, but indicate that the date has been conformed to the new style calendar.

Or leave it as is and explain the seeming discrepancy. The change in calendar can also explain the seemingly erroneous court item that shows the will was dated 3 December , and proved in court 1 January Once you understand this, you need to show it in your records, or others will think you have erred. The best way to show it is this: Be sure to use a slash and not a dash; it is the slash that clarifies you are referring to the double dates caused by calendar changes.

Don’t just convert the date with no explanation. If you do prefer to express it in new style N. For more on calendar history see www. It is important to interpret carefully when faced with dates that were shown in months. This prevalent Quaker custom was also used by some others. It is best, in extracting records that are expressed in months, to write them in your abstract as shown in the original record. If you want to show it also as it would be under the present calendar, add that in brackets.

Using the Right Calendar. Using the Right Calendar When the glossy new calendars start arriving in December, it probably doesn’t occur to you that New Year’s Day was not always 1 January. Tree Tips Though the difference of 11 days can explain some records he died on the third of the month but was not buried until the thirteenth , genealogists should not convert dates to account for the day difference unless the old style date would cause confusion.

What’s the Deal with Double or Odd Dating in Genealogy Research? If you have done genealogy for any length of time, you have probably come across a date. Dual dating is the practice, in historical materials, to indicate some dates with what appears to . Coordinator, New England Historic Genealogical Society; ^ Mike Spathaky Old Style New Style dates and the change to the Gregorian calendar.

History and Genealogy Reference Unit. Today, Americans are used to a calendar with a “year” based the earth’s rotation around the sun, with “months” having no relationship to the cycles of the moon and New Years Day falling on January 1. However, that system was not adopted in England and its colonies until Throughout history there have been numerous attempts to convey time in relation to the sun and moon.

When the glossy new calendars start arriving in December, it probably doesn’t occur to you that New Year’s Day was not always 1 January. Furthermore, it may not be obvious how this can affect your genealogical research.

Dual dating is the practice, in historical materials, to indicate some dates with what appears to be duplicate, or excessive digits, sometimes separated by a hyphen or a slash. This is also often referred to as double dating.

Family Tree

Beginning in 45 B. By the Julian calendar, March 25 was the first day of the year and each year was days and 6 hours long. This new calendar changed the first day of the year to January 1 and also jumped ahead by 10 days to make up for the lost time. The practice of double dating resulted from the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar. Not all countries and people accepted this new calendar at the same time. England and the American colonies didn’t officially accept it until

Dual dating

Revisions as of Dec are intended to prepare this page for being included in the revised Help. Conventions have been refined as per discussions or lack of response to suggested changes on the talk page. Wording has been changed in several places to add more detail or to clarify. If you wish to revise further to either clarify or make a section more concise , please do so. The preferred format for dates is d Mmm yyyy e. Fully numeric dates e. If the record of the event uses numeric dates, it should be converted and entered in the preferred format. See the discussion of conversion in Sources , below.

Almost everywhere in the world today, we use the Gregorian calendar.

The careful genealogist pays a great deal of attention to dates. One of the first things we must learn is how to properly record them to avoid ambiguity We must learn how to calculate when we know a person’s date at a specific age.

Genealogy double dating

Our calendar is like an old friend, always steady; always reliable. The year always begins on 1 January, and it ends on 31 December. There are twelve months. The day after 2 September is 3 September. Not long after humans began to notice the regular cycles of the sun and the moon, they began counting the days. The regular changes of the seasons defined the course of a year. In B. Their calendar began in March. It made perfect sense that the year should begin in the spring, when the crops were planted. Several hundred years later, in 46 B. The quarter-day gave rise to the concept of a leap year, with an extra day every fourth year.

Research Tip – Calendars and Double Dating

The Gregorian calendar was used before our current Julian calendar of today. This sometimes led to double dating in early colonial American records. Understand how the system worked and how you can apply it to your genealogy research and pedigree charts. This would be the years between when Jamestown was founded, and when we won our independence. Calendaring in the colonial times was different than our system today. Today, we use the Julian Calendar.

Genealogy double dating

Prior to , all of England and her colonies were using the Julian calendar to report ecclesiastical, legal, and civil events. In , they all changed to the Gregorian calendar. In order to properly interpret dates prior to , one must understand the difference between the Julian and Gregorian calendars. On the Julian calendar the first day of the year was March When the switch was made to the Gregorian calendar, January 1 became the first day of the year. This gives us a problem when a date is written as 15th day, 7th mo.

Genealogical Double-Dating?!? The Julian Calendar Explained

Millions of British citizens and their colonial counterparts across the Atlantic Ocean went to sleep on 2 September and woke up on 14 September. The calendar used by many nations around the world including both Britain and America was originally created by Julius Caesar in the year 45 B. This calendar moved the first day of the year to January 1st from its original date of March 1st. However, when the Roman Empire fell in the 5th century, the calendar was once again realigned to coincide with Christian Festivals. In , Pope Gregory XIII introduced and recommended use of the Gregorian Calendar, which dropped ten days from October to correct issues regarding the dates of equinoxes and seasonal changes and re-established 1 January as the beginning of the calendar year. This discrepancy in dating systems led to a unique situation familiar to many genealogists. Given the differences in how certain governing bodies and independent citizens represented the date, a system known as dual or double dating was frequently applied. Dual dating was common on both formal and informal documents in many European countries and their colonies for centuries.

Vita Brevis

Interview questions to set your interests. Dating back to a lot. Hints for all involved when i try to chronology and photos related to avoid confusion. Features of their boyfriends! How to indicate some dates, costumer, find more common ancestors. There are less an act of norman origin, except in genealogy.

Dangerous dates

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. See also: How do I write the year with a double date? There is a very good explanation here: In short, in various countries at various points in history, the day and month at which a “Year” started was not always the same. In England and Wales, for example, the ‘Civil’ or ‘Legal’ year used to start on 25th March, not 1st January which is when the ‘Historical’ year started.

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